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The dos and don'ts of tendering

In the second part of our article on how to make the most of tendering opportunities, we tell you what you should and shouldn't do if you want to win new business. Read part one for tips on selling to large organisations here.

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In the second part of our article on how to make the most of tendering opportunities, we tell you what you should and shouldn't do if you want to win new business. Read part one for tips on selling to large organisations here. Do provide ALL the requested information on time and in the required format. Remember that the date given for a response is normally the last date that a tender can be accepted. Late submissions are normally disqualified. Do study the tender documents carefully. This will help you to answer all the questions properly and show the buyer your capability to carry out the contract. There will often be a named contact on the tender documents; if in any doubt, do contact them for clarification as this could save you time and, more importantly, money. Do ensure that you get a receipt of delivery for your tender submission. This may be a signature for proof of postage if ‘hard copy' is required or an email ‘read' receipt if sent electronically. Do provide clear and concise contact details, including email address, website URL, telephone and fax numbers. Do thoroughly check your prices and data before final submission of quotations or tender pricing schedules. Do review your policies on a regular basis to ensure that they comply with current regulations. Do complete ALL sections of the tender document and ensure that you comply fully with the purchaser's terms and conditions. Don't send glossy brochures or any other information that has not been requested. If supplementary information is required, the purchaser will contact you. Don't seek to influence the decision by requesting meetings with the buyer; they are not permitted to do so during the tender process. If you are successful in being shortlisted, you will normally be invited to attend a tender evaluation panel meeting. Don't seek to amend your offer in any way after it has been submitted. Do ask for a de-brief. Whether you are successful or not, it's important to learn what you did right and how you can improve your chances next time. Don't give up. If at first you don't succeed, try and try again; just as you would in any other sales activity. About the author Procurement Connection is a Community Interest Company for local private and public sector business community gain. They host events across the UK to help connecting public sector organisations with their local business community. Plus, members of the Forum can get £5 off the event price. Find out more and claim your discount code here.

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