Back to all resources

How to challenge the rateable value of your business property

Business rates are calculated using a figure called the rateable valueof your business premises. If you think that the rateable value of your property is too high, you do have the right to appeal to the Valuation Office Agency and, failing that, a Valuation Tribunal.

Like this resource?

Become a member for access to more resources and benefits.

Learn more

Business rates are calculated using a figure called the rateable value of your business premises. If you think that the rateable value of your property is too high, you do have the right to appeal to the Valuation Office Agency and, failing that, a Valuation Tribunal. Rateable values are set for business properties every five years, with the last revaluation taking place in April 2010. If you don't think the rateable for your property is correct, or you believe a mistake has been made, you have a right to challenge it through a Valuation Tribunal. However, before making an appeal, you should always contact the Valuation Office Agency (VOA) who set the rateable value. They can check whether the rateable value on your bill is correct and may be able to change or recalculate it without the need to go to tribunal, saving you time and money. If you do decide to go to tribunal, you will need to have evidence to show why you believe your rateable value is wrong. Often circumstances change over time and valuations do need to be reviewed and amended. The grounds for appealing against your valuation fall into one of the following categories: The rateable value shown in the Rating List is wrong, as set at revaluation (2010). There has been a material change of circumstances which has affected the value of your property, such as: a physical change to the building a physical change to the local area a change in the use of the building a change in the use of a neighbouring property. A Valuation Officer's change in value is wrong. There is another sort of error in the list entry, for example the address is wrong – this can often be rectified through the VOA. A decision by a valuation tribunal (VT), lands tribunal or higher court has affected your own valuation. The property has been demolished or no longer exists. The property (or part of it) is now domestic or exempt from rating and is no longer rateable. The property should be exempt for another reason, other than those above. The property should be considered for rating as more than one property, or several properties should be considered as one property. One point of warning is that by taking your case to tribunal, there is a chance your appeal may not be successful and, in some cases, they may find that your rateable value should actually increase. The Valuation Tribunal provides a free service but it doesn't award costs, so you would have to pay any professional costs of going to a hearing. Appeals can take around six months and whilst making an appeal, you must continue to pay your business rates as normal. Also, bear in mind that you can only appeal once against the rateable value set at revaluation. You can also appeal once on any of the other grounds set out above. If you do employ a professional surveyor or agent to help you with your appeal, you should make sure that they are from a reputable company. Many of our members have been approached by disreputable companies running business rates scams, so beware of anyone who approaches you and suggests that you need to appeal. When you do choose a surveyor or agent, make sure that they are accredited by one of the following organisations: The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) The Institute of Revenues, Rating and Valuation (IRRV) The Rating Surveyors Association (RSA). RICS will provide businesses with the name of your nearest professionally recognised rating surveying firm, which will give you up to 30 minutes of free advice. They can be contacted on 020 7222 7000. Useful information The VOA has a list of common reasons for appeal – is yours one of them and is there any easier solution? Download a guide to appealing non-domestic rates from the Valuation Tribunal.

×